Erma Bombeck
Erma BombeckFebruary 21, 1927 - April 22, 1996
Erma Louise Bombeck (née Fiste; February 21, 1927 – April 22, 1996) was an American humorist who achieved great popularity for her newspaper column that described suburban home life from the mid-1960s until the late 1990s. Bombeck also published 15 books, most of which became bestsellers. From 1965 to 1996, Erma Bombeck wrote over 4,000 newspaper columns, using broad and sometimes eloquent humor, chronicling the ordinary life of a midwestern suburban housewife. By the 1970s, her columns were read twice-weekly by 30 million readers of the 900 newspapers in the U.S. and Canada....
Hunter S. Thompson
Hunter S. ThompsonJuly 18, 1937 - February 20, 2005
Mignon McLaughlin
Mignon McLaughlinJune 6, 1913 - December 20, 1983
Mignon McLaughlin (June 6, 1913 – December 20, 1983) was an American journalist and author. In the 1950s, she began publishing aphorisms that were later collected in three books, entitled, The Neurotic’s Notebook, The Second Neurotic’s Notebook and The Complete Neurotic’s Notebook. She is known for a number of quotes, among them: "A successful marriage requires falling in love many times, always with the same person." "Anything you lose automatically doubles in value." "Every society honors its live conformists and its dead troublemakers." Mignon McLaughlin was born in Baltimore,...
Ann Landers
Ann LandersJuly 4, 1918 - June 22, 2002
Charles Kuralt
Charles KuraltSeptember 10, 1934 - July 4, 1997
Charles Kuralt (September 10, 1934 – July 4, 1997) was an American journalist. He was most widely known for his long career with CBS, first for his "On the Road" segments on The CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite, and later as the first anchor of CBS News Sunday Morning, a position he held for fifteen years. Kuralt's "On the Road" segments were recognized twice with personal Peabody Awards. The first, awarded in 1968, cited those segments as heartwarming and "nostalgic vignettes"; in 1975, the award was for his work as a U.S. "bicentennial historian"; his work "capture[d] the...
Walter Winchell
Walter WinchellApril 7, 1897 - February 20, 1972
Ambrose Bierce
Ambrose BierceJune 24, 1842 - 1914
Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (June 24, 1842 – circa 1914) was an American editorialist, journalist, short story writer, fabulist, and satirist. He wrote the short story "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and compiled a satirical lexicon, The Devil's Dictionary. His vehemence as a critic, his motto "Nothing matters", and the sardonic view of human nature that informed his work, all earned him the nickname "Bitter Bierce". Despite his reputation as a searing critic, Bierce was known to encourage younger writers, including poet George Sterling and fiction writer W. C. Morrow. Bierce employed a...
David Frost
David FrostApril 7, 1939 - August 31, 2013
Sir David Paradine Frost, OBE (7 April 1939 – 31 August 2013) was an English journalist, comedian, writer, media personality and television host. After graduating from Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, Frost rose to prominence in the UK when he was chosen to host the satirical programme That Was the Week That Was in 1962. His success on this show led to work as a host on US television. He became known for his television interviews with senior political figures, among them The Nixon Interviews with former United States President Richard Nixon in 1977, which were adapted into a stage...
Andy Rooney
Andy RooneyJanuary 14, 1919 - November 4, 2011