Carl von Clausewitz
Carl von ClausewitzJune 1, 1780 - November 16, 1831
Carl Philipp Gottfried (or Gottlieb) von Clausewitz (/ˈklaʊzəvɪts/; June 1, 1780 – November 16, 1831) was a Prussian general and military theorist who stressed the "moral" (in modern terms, psychological) and political aspects of war. His most notable work, Vom Kriege (On War), was unfinished at his death. Clausewitz was a realist and, while in some respects a romantic, also drew heavily on the rationalist ideas of the European Enlightenment. His thinking is often described as Hegelian because of his references to dialectical thinking but, although he was probably personally acquainted...

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